Lower Columbia College | 2000s

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Lower Columbia College History ~ Brief Highlights from the 2000s

Lower Columbia College began this decade with high enrollment rates and the construction and opening of the Rose Center for the Arts.

2000

The new Head Start Building opened on campus and 493 students graduated.

The Lady Red Devils won a second consecutive NWAACC Softball Championship.

The LCC Forensics team won the Phi Rho Pi National Championship.

2000-01

Enrollment reached 2,493.

The LCC Foundation set a fundraising record of $856,960.

2001

LCC hosted the first annual Justice and Hope Domestic Violence Conference, funded by a multi-year Community Health Education Center grant.

The Lady Red Devils won a third consecutive NWAACC Softball Championship.

LCC began the Career Education Options (CEO) program for students ages 16-21 to earn their high school diploma.

2002

The Lady Red Devils won a fourth consecutive NWAACC Softball Championship.

2003

The Lady Red Devils won a fifth consecutive NWAACC Softball Championship.

LCC received a $2 million Title III Strengthening Institutions Grant from the U.S. Dept. of Education to fund improvements in technology infrastructure, programs and training.

2004

Enrollment reached 6,789.

The LCC LPN program marked its 50th Anniversary at LCC.

The Salal Review arts and literary magazine received the Washington Community College Humanities Association award.

LCC hosted an International Peace Conference through the United Nations' Circle of Reflection doctoral program.

LCC student John Lynch won Phi Theta Kappa's national Leader of Promise Award.

LCC's Phi Theta Kappa Gamma Tau won multiple national and regional awards at the International Convention.

The Lady Red Devils won their sixth consecutive NWAACC Softball championship.

LCC men's basketball won it's first NWAACC Championship in 50 years.

LCC received a $620,000 Advanced Technology grant from the National Science Foundation to train workers in new technology for the pulp and paper industry.

2005

LCC began the LPN2RN program for LPN nurses to earn RN certification.

Men's basketball and baseball teams both won NWAACC Championships.

The Salal Review arts and literary magazine received a National Community College Humanities Association award.

2006

LCC student Tadd Wheeler was the first LCC student to receive a Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship, the largest national award available for community college transfer students.

The Contemporary Musicianship & Audio Production program began.

The Lady Red Devils won a seventh NWAACC Softball Championship.

LCC student Susan McNally was named to the All-USA Academic All Stars Team.

2007

The LCC Forensics team won the Phi Rho Pi National Community College Tournament.

The Lady Red Devils won an eighth NWAACC Softball Championship.

2008

The LCC Foundation concluded the Reaching Higher Campaign, raising $4.5 million for equipment, scholarships and Rose Center enhancements.

The Rose Center for the Arts building officially opened.

The Lady Red Devils won a ninth NWAACC Softball Championship.

2009

LCC student Camiliana Wood won the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship (the second LCC student to win in four years).

LCC enrollment reached the largest in school history; over 8,000 students.

LCC began the Rural Outreach Nursing Education program, providing complete nursing program to rural communities through online courses and hospital partnerships for clinical instruction.